Webcam Hackers Threaten To Release Video Of Australian Man Masturbating Unless He Pays Ransom

Hackers Threaten To Release Masturbation Video

Australia is becoming something of a mecca for cybercrime attack, and the latest example may lead you to join the legions who’ve covered their computer’s camera with tape. According to CBS News, a man identified only as Matt received an email that happened to contain a video of a man masturbating. To Matt’s abject shock, that man was him – he apparently had been hacked. The email said that the hackers would release the video to all of Matt’s Facebook friends, as well as his contact list and people he worked with, if he didn’t pay up.

The hack was possible thanks to a piece of ransomware that had ended up on Matt’s computer. While it’s difficult to get good specific data on ransomware attacks, the Australian government’s cybercrime initiative got approximately 4,000 reports of scam or fraud cybercrime in the last three months of 2015. Another report indicates that 60 percent of the nearly two million known instances of the CryptoLocker malware in 2014 were detected in Australia. According to a report from the security firm Websense, over a million ransomware attacks were recorded in Australia just in October of 2015.

Computer users worldwide can take simple measures to protect themselves from potential malware and/or ransomware invasion. ARN has an excellent example from 2015 of the kind of email that, if you aren’t careful, can result in your computer being infected. Be extra careful with emails, especially if they contain links – think before you click. Hackers and scammers are growing adept at formatting their messages to pass as “normal” emails from a company or bank, when they aren’t. Look at the link before you click to make sure it’s from that company. Make sure the email is from the company’s email address. So many of us have received an email about accounts at banks we’ve never done business with. That’s a prime example of how these scammers and hackers can easily bait unsuspecting users into inadvertently giving up information or even clicking a link that puts ransomware on the computer. If you get an email saying a particular account is not up to date, and you actually have an account at that bank, don’t click on the link in the email. Log in to the bank’s website if you feel compelled to check. Some malicious macros in Microsoft Office are even the source of such ransomware attacks. Be careful with any new macro that you may encounter at your work. Your boss will be grateful for the extra diligence.

Matt managed to negotiate the hackers’s ransom demand of $10,000 down to $3,000, but instead of paying up, he decided to simply tell his Facebook feed and contacts what had happened to him. While he said that many were supportive, so far, the hackers have not carried out their threat to release the video.

CBS News brought us this report on how ransomware has become more of a threat in 2016.

Read more:

Daily Mail

ABC Australia’s Triple J

Social News Daily

Lifehacker Australia

ACORN: Australian Cybercrime Online Reporting Network

ARN

CBS News

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