Cold Case: Was This Canadian College Student Murdered By A Serial Killer?

Theresa Allore [Sûreté du Québec Police]

On November 3, 1978, a 19-year-old Canadian college student named Theresa Allore disappeared from Champlain College Lennoxville in the Eastern Townships of Quebec.

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She was reported missing after failing to show up for an activity with friends that night. Police initially suspected that Theresa may have been a runaway. On April 13, 1979, her body was discovered in a small body of water approximately half a mile from her dorm. On April 20, 1979, Teresa’s wallet was found on a road around six miles from the place where her body was found.

When her body was discovered, investigators stated that she could have taken a drug overdose, perhaps with the assistance of fellow college students. But Theresa’s family and friends never believed investigators’ theories.

In the summer of 2002, the family of Theresa Allore enlisted the support of an investigative reporter and friend, Patricia Pearson, who produced a series of articles for the National Post newspaper that presented compelling evidence that Theresa Allore was a victim of murder. The articles also theorized that Allore’s death was possibly linked to two other unsolved local cases; the death of 10-year-old Manon Dube in March 1978, and the murder of Louise Camirand in 1977.

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The theory was supported by geographic profiler and then FBI consultant Kim Rossmo, who suggested a serial sexual predator may have been operating in the Quebec region in the late 1970s. He told police that he suspected that the three murders were connected.

In 1998, Rossmo suggested that Vancouver police create a serial killer task force to investigate the multiple cases of missing women from Vancouver’s Eastside.

Pig farmer Robert “Willie” Pickton was eventually arrested and found guilty of six murders — though he was accused of an additional 26 killings. Horribly, he fed the remains of his victims to his pigs, and may have even served a mixture of pig and human meat to party guests.

Related: Prolific Serial Killer Robert Pickton, Who Fed His Victims To His Pigs

The deaths of Theresa Allore, Manon Dube, and Louise Camirand remain unsolved cold-cases, although some suspect that they met their fates at the hand of Pickton.

Since 2002, Theresa’s brother John Allore, who maintains the website “Who Killed Theresa?” has continued the investigation. He has said he believes that the Canadian police are “completely incompetent.” He has identified several failures in the investigation into his sister’s murder, including the fact that he claims the police have destroyed vital evidence.

Theresa’s unsolved murder was finally added to the website of the Quebec provincial police force’s cold case unit in 2016.

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Allore has stated that he believes that one or more serial killers have been active in the same geographic regions of Canada for decades. Allore has geographically identified an additional 15 unsolved murders from 1975 to 1981 which may be associated. The victims are: Sharron Prior, Lise Choquette, Louise Camirand, Jocelyne Houle, Chantal Tremblay, Johanne Dorion, Hélène Monast, Katherine Hawkes, Denise Bazinet, Manon Dube, Lison Blais, Theresa Allore, Nicole Gaudreaux, Tammy Leakey, and Johanne Lemieux.

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Read more:

TheresaAllore.com

CanCrime.com

Main photo: Theresa Allore [Sûreté du Québec Police]

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